Making Feed and sources.

How to Raise Duckweed for Feed for Chickens and Fish.                                          

By Judith  Willson,
How to Raise Duckweed for Feed thumbnail

Duckweed is easy to grow for animal feed.

Duckweed is a tiny  floating plant. In fact, one variety, watermeal or rootless duckweed, is the  smallest known flowering plant.  However, duckweed is very prolific. A few  handfuls of duckweed quickly turn into a lot more as long as there are light and  nutrients. Duckweed is high in protein and can be used as supplemental food  for ducks, geese, chickens, pigs and some kinds of fish. Raising a supply  yourself cuts costs.

Things You’ll Need

  •  

    Duckweed

  •  

    Large tray, pond or tank

  •  

    Net

  •  

    Organic fertilizer or dead leaves  and soil

Instructions

    • 1

      Position a large shallow container in a site that gets plenty of sunlight.  You can raise duckweed in a garden  pond,  but not one with fish already in it. Either the fish will eat the duckweed  faster than it can reproduce or the duckweed will overwhelm the pond, blocking  light. You need a dedicated pond, tank or large waterproof  tray.

    • 2

      Fill the container with at least 6 inches of water.

    • 3

      Fertilize the water. The fertilizer can be any basic pond or garden fertilizer.  Organic ones are safer for your  animals. A large handful of dead leaves and a bit of garden soil does the same  job for free.

    • 4

      Collect some duckweed from a pond, aquatic supplier or nursery.

    • 5Use a net to start harvesting duckweed after a week or so. It grows so  quickly that you can take about 50 percent of the weed every two or three days  thereafter. Rinse before using as  feed.

      How to Feed Chickens With Duckweed

      By Judith  Willson,
      How to Feed Chickens With Duckweed thumbnail

      Use duckweed only as a  supplementary food source for chickens.

      Duckweed can be a nutritious,  high-protein part of your chickens’ diet, although it certainly should not be  their only food source. Chickens enjoy both dried and fresh duckweed, which is  beneficial if you have a pond and need to regularly remove excess duckweed from  it anyway. Interestingly, adding carotene-rich duckweed to your hens’ diet will  make their egg yolks a vibrant yellow color. Some people cultivate duckweed to  feed their poultry. This can be done even on a small scale since duckweed  requires little care and grows quickly.

      Things You’ll Need

      Instructions

        • 1

          Harvest fresh duckweed from a pond or cultivation vat with a  net.

        • 2

          Rinse the duckweed in fresh water to remove any mud or  debris.

        • 3

          Start by feeding your chickens a small amount of fresh or dried duckweed, as  a part of their regular diet.

        • 4

          Increase the amount of duckweed you feed your chickens and reduce their  regular food accordingly. Do this gradually over a few weeks. Up to one quarter of the  chickens’ diet can consist of dried duckweed, but do not introduce it into their  diet all at once. Since fresh duckweed contains so much water, use it just to  supplement your chickens’  diet.

      How to Dry Duckweed

      By Chelsea Hoffman,
       
      How to Dry Duckweed thumbnail

      A pond covered in floating  duckweed

      A tiny aquatic  flowering plant, duckweed thrives in deep, undisturbed pond waters and can  become an invasive pest if it isn’t controlled. Controlling the duckweed by  removal, allows it to serve as a feed supplement for livestock such as cattle,  sheep, pigs, horses and farm fowl. Make use of this fast-growing water plant,  which is high in  protein  and fiber, by drying duckweed at home to include your animals’ feed.

      Things You’ll Need

      •  

        Duckweed (2 cups)

      •  

        Strainer

      •  

        Food dehydrator

      •  

        Plastic storage  container

      Instructions

        • 1

          Rinse the duckweed under a sink faucet in the strainer to remove dirt and  other impurities. Allow it to drain.

        • 2

          Place the duckweed on the racks of a home food dehydrator. Food  dehydrators are found in most grocery stores for under $20 as of 2010.

        • 3

          Spread the duckweed out evenly on each rack to allow for optimal  drying.

        • 4

          Switch the food dehydrator on and allow it to dry the duckweed for about 15  minutes.

        • 5

          Dump the duckweed into a plastic storage  container. Leave the lid off for three days to allow the duckweed to finish  drying on its own. This allows the nutrients to stay within the  plants.

      How to Make Your Own Fish Food        Gelatin approach with frigeration

      By Curtis Fease,

      Things You’ll Need

      •  

        Any type of greens, fruits, and  vegetables

      •  

        Blender or food  processor

      •  

        Shrimp and crab legs  (optional)

      •  

        Smelt

      •  

        Liquid vitamins OR

      •  

        Crushed tablets OR

      •  

        Selco or selcon

      Instructions

        • 1

          Place your greens, fruits, and vegetables into your blender  or food processor.  These can include oranges, apples, broccoli, carrots and many  others.

        • 2

          Add meat slowly to the blender while blending.

        • 3

          Blend mixture as fine as possible

        • 4

          Add the tablets/vitamins/Selcon.  The solution will have the consistency of  mud.  If it seems too thick, add some liquid.   Proper liquids include carrot  juice, sweet  potato juice, clam juice or water.

        • 5

          Boil 100 to 150 ml of water.  Add the exact same amount of non-flavored  gelatin to the boiling water.

        • 6

          Mix the gelatin and the vegatable mixture together and pour it into a  rectangular pan.  Allow the mixture to cool.

        • 7

          Place the pan in the freezer.  Take the mixture out before it is completely frozen so it isn’t too difficult  to separate.

        • 8

          Separate the mixture and divide it into different freezer bags.  Place the  bags in the freezer until ready for  use.

      More:
      Natural Farming emphasizes the use of homemade chicken feed. We cut down the use of commercial feed as much as possible. But feed is not just simply made from material lying around. Nutrient balance and effect to chicken bodies are carefully calculated. That is why we can confidently say that NF homemade feed is better than commercial ones. We do not worry about ” what to buy”, we speculate on and ” how we use” ” what we have.” Feed is given only once a day compared to conventional poultry where it’s given 3-4 times or even throughout the day. We follow the rule ” once full and once hungry” in one day. Feed is given 2 hours before sunset. Observing the law of nature, Natural farming chickens have 2 times longer productive period ( 2-3 years) than conventional method. Not to mention that the NF chickens are much healthy and happy.
      * Brown rice grains and bamboo leaves
      In NF, we feed freshly hatched chicks with whole brown rice grains in unlimited quantity. No powder feed are given. After giving for 3 days for layer and 1 day for broilers, we add bamboo leaves. On day 50, we add rice husks; gradually increase the proportion to reach 20-25% of the total feed after 6 months when egg-laying rate is 60%. This kind of feed toughens the intestines and grows a very healthy chicken. Fed with soft and nutritious feed,chicks do not develop strong digestive organs and excrete undigested nutrition. This is source of smell and disease. Just as the newly germinating sprout has the most vital power, the freshly hatched chick has a vigorous ability to adapt and develop. Feeding this tough food, NF chicks develop intestines 260-300cm long, and  ordinary chicks  only grow 130-140cm long. And the length of cecum is seven times longer!
      * Homemade feed
      All material other than mineral matter ( rocks) can be turned into feed. For example, fresh green is a good feed. It is available everywhere. It makes up for 1/3 of total feed for adult chickens. Bamboo leaves rich in fiber also serve as an excellent feed. Feed is abundant on the floors too. Chicken feces are converted into feed by IMOs. Spraying FPJ and LAB will promote fermentation. This can make up for 7-10% of the total feed. Soil rich in microorganisms is also a given. Rice husks make up 15-20% of the feed from late Feb to mid May to hold down the laying rate. It can make up as much as 25% to maintain steady laying rate ( 65-70% for 3 years ).

      Mixing homemade feed. Rice husk, bran, wild grass, oyster/clam shells, food waste, soil, sawdust,etc. Almost anything can be fed.

 

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